Feed The Stash

My fiber stash continues to grow. Here are some recent additions.

From A Verb for Keeping Warm’s Pro-Verbial Club, April 2016, I received 56g of Merino wool (purple) and 56g of silver alpaca (gray), meant to be spun separately, then plied together. This is my last installment of this club, and I don’t plan to sign up for the next installment. The fiber is gorgeous, but with the exception of this final installment, I really don’t know quite what to do with it.

This was something of an impulse buy when I was ordering some things from WEBS. It’s a limited edition colorway from Frabjous Fibers that was offered at an irresistible price, and it’s BFL and silk. And it has a baseball theme. And it’s gorgeous.

This is the April installment of the into the whirled Classic Club. The fiber is Cheviot ♡♡♡ and the colorway is Cattywampus. I think the colorway should be called Go Bubblers! because the school colors of the high school where I used to live, Boiling Springs Pennsylvania, are purple and gold, and the school nickname is the Bubblers, in honor of “The Bubble,” the place where a huge underground spring bubbles up to the surface and feeds the lake that you see in the picture at the top of my blog.

This fiber is Manx Laoghton wool, which is similar to Shetland wool, and just as wonderful to spin. It was dyed in the colorway Big Thaw by Amy King, the brilliant dyer behind Spunky Eclectic. This is the April 2016 installment of the Spunky Club. I’m really happy I chose the double shot for the Spunky Club.

I subscribed to the Spring fiber club offered by the amazing Felica Lo of Sweet Georgia Yarns. Felicia is know for gorgeous saturated colors, and she has never failed to thrill me. This is the first of three installments. More BFL/Silk. Yum!

I made a big mistake. I was browsing on Etsy, and I just couldn’t resist this braid of Cheviot ♡♡♡ from The First Draft. I love the other braids from The First Draft that I have spun, and as a bonus, each braid comes with a small card on which to record all the technical stuff when you spin the fiber and a lovely hand-crafted stitch marker. This colorway is called For Alice, and the braid is 4 ounces.

Here’s another braid from The First Draft. I think Lindey is a brilliant dyer. Not only are her colors gorgeous and perfect for spinning self-striping yarn, a lovely fractal, or a marled yarn, the fiber is handled gently during the dyeing process. I’ve yet to get any that is compacted or felted. This colorway, which is called Indiana, reminds me of summer–blue skies and sunflowers. The fiber is Rambouillet, which I have never spun before but want to try. I couldn’t resist this happy colorway.

Yes, this is another braid from Lindey at The First Draft. This one is a gradient called Spring Shoots. The picture doesn’t do it justice. I plan to split the braid to make four skeins of a chain-plied gradient yarn for fingerless mitts and maybe a matching hat. If I don’t have enough yarn for a hat, I should be able to make a second pair of mitts.

I probably shouldn’t mention that I have also purchased yarn recently. Oh, my!

At Last

Finally, after fourteen long, long, long months, the kitchen is finished. Well, sort off. There is still a little bit of painting to do, and we ran four pencil tiles short thanks to me changing the design on the fly without giving a thought to the number of tiles we had. But the painting will get done soon, and the tile is on order and will just need to be cemented into place and grouted once it arrives.

I’m very pleased with the work the tile setters did. There was one hiccup along the way,

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I didn’t like the way the corner blocks were laid, with long butting on long, short butting on short. The the outside edge with the mitered long bull nose tile was not even close to what I wanted.

 

but it was taken care of to my satisfaction, and the tile looks marvelous!

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I think the corner looks much better with long tile butting short tile, and the outside edge is now exactly what I had envisioned.

And now the kitchen looks the way it is supposed to.

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Now I don’t have to worry about splattering food and grease on the painted walls. Tile is so much easier to clean, and the grout is stain-resistant stuff that doesn’t have to be sealed repeatedly.

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I changed the design to have tile all the way up to the window sill instead of keeping the wood apron that the previous contractor had put up, and that’s why we ran short of the pencil tile that separates the mosaic tile from the subway tile. I thought I had told our backsplash designer that that is what I wanted, but apparently there was a misunderstanding.

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The chase that holds the stack was the trickiest part of the entire job, but the tile setter was up to the task.

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The metal strip on the corner is called a Schluter, and it gives the glass tile a nice edge while adding a nice accent.

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The tile setter put a strip of wood in the place where the pencil tile goes. When the tile arrives, we will just need to unscrew and remove the wood strip and glue the tile into place, then grout it.

Words cannot express how happy I am to finally have the kitchen finished.

This Is What Happens…

Okay, so I want to knit something spectacular, maybe a big lace shawl or a fancy sweater. But I just can’t figure out which pattern, what yarn. So instead, I have a zillion small projects OTN.

I am knitting this Skyp Rib Hat based on the Skyp Rib Socks pattern to match a pair of mitts I knitted as part of my participation in the 16-Point Club in the Ravelry group Fingerless Glove Fanatics.

These are the Skyp Rib Mitts which I knitted for the 16-Point Club. I converted the Skyp Rib Socks pattern into a pattern for fingerless mitts. They yarn is an Opal handpainted sock yarn (color #17, Multi), and it probably wasn’t the best choice for the pattern, but the pattern was a good choice for the yarn. Capisce?

More fingerless mitts, these doing double duty for both the FGF 16-Point Club and the April 2016 MKAL (Mystery Knit-A-Long). This is clue #1 of the pattern, which is called Shadowplay. It’s corrugated ribbing, not my favorite thing to knit, but it looks great. I’m using complementary colors, which is one of the challenged of the 16-Point Club. The yarn is some Sisu sock yarn I had in my stash. It’s a nice, soft yarn, but it is splitty, so I don’t recommend it.

Yes, another pair of fingerless mitts, and yes, these are part of the 16-Poin Club. The stitch pattern is a waffle stitch, and I designed the mitts myself. I call them the Orange You Glad Waffle Mitts because they are mitts in a waffle pattern knitted in stash yarn, a ball of Brown Sheep Naturespun Worsted in the color Orange You Glad. Clever, aren’t I?

This is what happens when I cannot decided what to knit next. ::SIGH::

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did You Notice?

I have been using the same theme, Liquorice, since I moved my blog to WordPress and today I decided I needed a new look. So I searched the available themes and settled on one that is very similar to Liquorice. Go figure.

I hope you like the new look, but if you don’t? Oh, well.

And So It Grows

Yes, my spinning fiber stash just keeps getting bigger, in spite of my efforts to keep it under control by spinning, spinning, and spinning. I’m not ready to give up any of my fiber clubs quite yet, so I will just have to find room for all the fiber. Of course, every time I complete a spinning project, my fiber stash gets a little smaller, but my yarn stash gets bigger. And so it goes grows.

New fiber from February and March:

Into The Whirled 24 1/2th Century Falkland top

Into The Whirled Madame Vestra BFL

Spunky Eclectic Aspens Farmer’s Sheepwool (BFL)

Spunky Eclectic Black Pillar Polwarth/Mohair/Silk

Current spinning projects:

I’ve started spinning one bump of this lovely superwash Merino from Into The Whirled in the colorway Godric’s Hollow.

I split the bump in half vertically and I am spinning each half end to end onto one bobbin. I plan to chain ply the singles to make a self-striping yarn. I split the bump so that the color repeats (stripes) would be small.

These two braids are the December 2015 installment of the Sweet Georgia Yarns Fibre Club. The colorway is called Wistmas.

Wistmas is on a base of BFL, and I decided to do a fractal spin. This bobbin contains the singles spun from the braid that I split into 12 strips vertically. I spun the other braid end to end without splitting.

The plying is almost done. Because I spun two bumps, approximately 200 grams, of fiber, I filled one bobbin and had to start on a second bobbin. This is a straight-up 2-ply yarn, and the second bobbin is about 2/3s done. I love the sheen of BFL.

 

Holy Cow!

I cannot believe how long it has been since I wrote a blog post. How did I let that happen? It isn’t as though I haven’t been doing some knitting, albeit really boring knitting, or spinning–lots and lots of spinning. So, here’s a quick catch-up.

The kitchen remodel still isn’t done. It was a year ago February 12th, I think, that we signed a contract to have our kitchen remodeled. The job was supposed to be started right away and finished in 3 to 4 weeks. After more than a year, we finally terminated the contract and are now in the process of getting bids to get the work finished. All that’s left to do is the tile backsplash and some trim work. After some back and forth wrangling with the contractor from Hell, we finally gained possession of the tile and got him out of our lives forever. I’m hopeful we can have the rest of the work finished before the end of April, and then we can move on to other parts of the house.

My knitting mojo has been in the doldrums. I’ve finished some fingerless mitts and a scarf knitted out of handspun. I have a custom-order scarf nearly finished, too late for the recipient to wear this winter (it will be Spring in a couple of days), but in plenty of time for next winter. And I have a pair of plain vanilla socks OTN. I need to start an interesting knitting project, but I just can’t decided on anything.

Spinning is a different story. I’ve been spinning up a storm. I currently have 8 ounces of handspun 2-ply yarn resting on bobbins, ready to be wound off on the niddy noddy, two bobbins of singles resting and waiting to be plied, and another bobbin of singles-in-progress. And I have at least eight other skeins of handspun completed so far this year.

I am going to try to keep up with my blog starting now, but I’m not going to promise because I once was told that one should not make promises one might not be able to keep.:-)

Here are pictures of a few of the finished items linked to the appropriate Ravelry project page, in case you are interested in the details.

Shades of Green Handspun Scarf while still in progress. I haven’t take a picture of the finished scarf yet.